Friday, August 29th

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Friday, August 29

Nehemiah 10:28-39


“The rest of the people, the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, the temple servants, and all who have separated themselves from the peoples of the lands to the Law of God, their wives, their sons, their daughters, all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes. We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land or take their daughters for our sons. And if the peoples of the land bring in goods or any grain on the Sabbath day to sell, we will not buy from them on the Sabbath or on a holy day. And we will forego the crops of the seventh year and the exaction of every debt.


“We also take on ourselves the obligation to give yearly a third part of a shekel for the service of the house of our God: for the showbread, the regular grain offering, the regular burnt offering, the Sabbaths, the new moons, the appointed feasts, the holy things, and the sin offerings to make atonement for Israel, and for all the work of the house of our God. We, the priests, the Levites, and the people, have likewise cast lots for the wood offering, to bring it into the house of our God, according to our fathers' houses, at times appointed, year by year, to burn on the altar of the Lord our God, as it is written in the Law. We obligate ourselves to bring the firstfruits of our ground and the firstfruits of all fruit of every tree, year by year, to the house of the Lord; also to bring to the house of our God, to the priests who minister in the house of our God, the firstborn of our sons and of our cattle, as it is written in the Law, and the firstborn of our herds and of our flocks; and to bring the first of our dough, and our contributions, the fruit of every tree, the wine and the oil, to the priests, to the chambers of the house of our God; and to bring to the Levites the tithes from our ground, for it is the Levites who collect the tithes in all our towns where we labor. And the priest, the son of Aaron, shall be with the Levites when the Levites receive the tithes. And the Levites shall bring up the tithe of the tithes to the house of our God, to the chambers of the storehouse. For the people of Israel and the sons of Levi shall bring the contribution of grain, wine, and oil to the chambers, where the vessels of the sanctuary are, as well as the priests who minister, and the gatekeepers and the singers. We will not neglect the house of our God.”


Nearly twenty years ago one of our ushers wanted to show me something after one of our worship services. I think he had participated in collecting and counting the offering that day and he thought I would be interested to see something he found in one of the offering plates.

He took me to the room where they counted the offering and showed me a small gold ring. Evidently someone had placed the ring in the offering plate that day instead of a check or cash.

It turned out that the ring didn’t have great monetary value, probably not much more than $5 or $10, but that’s not really the point, is it?

I have often thought about that little ring and what led the person to offer it as a gift to God. Was the person simply so moved during worship that, when the offering time came, he or she spontaneously slipped the ring off and dropped it into the plate? Did the person have nothing else of value, no cash or checking account, and so chose to give a piece of jewelry? Did the ring have some kind of symbolic or emotional value to the giver?

I don’t know what motivated the gift of the ring because I don’t know the giver. If I knew who gave the gift I would thank him or her for the beautiful demonstration of giving as an act of worship.

Notice the different kinds of offerings that Nehemiah encourages the people to bring to God.

“We also take on ourselves the obligation to give yearly a third part of a shekel for the service of the house of our God: for the showbread, the regular grain offering, the regular burnt offering... We, the priests, the Levites, and the people, have likewise cast lots for the wood offering, to bring it into the house of our God...to burn on the altar of the Lord our God... We obligate ourselves to bring the firstfruits of our ground and the firstfruits of all fruit of every tree, year by year, to the house of the Lord; also to bring to the house of our God...the firstborn of our sons and of our cattle... and the firstborn of our herds and of our flocks; and to bring the first of our dough, and our contributions, the fruit of every tree, the wine and the oil, to the priests, to the chambers of the house of our God; and to bring to the Levites the tithes from our ground... For the people of Israel and the sons of Levi shall bring the contribution of grain, wine, and oil to the chambers, where the vessels of the sanctuary are...


The people were to bring money (shekels), bread, grain, wood, fruit, cattle, dough, wine, oil...as a “tithe” to the Lord. Throughout the Old Testament the “tithe” is understood as the first tenth of one’s wealth, produce, herds or flocks. The tithe was given in obedience to God; in thanksgiving for all he had provided; and the tithe allowed the sacrifices of worship to continue to take place.


The tithes and offerings were both a response of obedience and an expression of worship. Remember that we give our worship to God because we believe he is worthy of our deepest devotion; we worship God because he is worth it.


Notice Nehemiah’s straightforward expression of commitment on behalf of the people he leads:

“We will not neglect the house of our God.”


He’s talking about both the worship of God and the tithe to God. Let’s finish this week with a direct question: Is there any way in your worship or in your generosity that you are neglecting the house of your God?

Pastor Brian Coffey

Thursday, August 28th

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Thursday, August 28

Nehemiah 10:28-39


“The rest of the people, the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, the temple servants, and all who have separated themselves from the peoples of the lands to the Law of God, their wives, their sons, their daughters, all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes. We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land or take their daughters for our sons. And if the peoples of the land bring in goods or any grain on the Sabbath day to sell, we will not buy from them on the Sabbath or on a holy day. And we will forego the crops of the seventh year and the exaction of every debt.

Nehemiah is addressing two big issues here that we might miss because we don’t understand the ancient culture in which the story takes place.

First, he’s addressing the issue of economic injustice that he already dealt with in more detail back in chapter 5. Some had used their economic position to take advantage of others through lending money and grain at interest rates that were oppressive, and were taking land and even children as collateral. He is saying, in no uncertain terms, that those practices will stop and all those debts are to be forgiven!

Secondly, he’s dealing with the twin issues of poverty and hunger, which always go together. When he says, “And we will forego the crops of the seventh year...” he is recalling the command of God way back in the book of Exodus.

...but during the seventh year let the land lie unplowed and unused. Then the poor among your people may get food from it, and the wild animals may eat what is left. Do the same with your vineyard and your olive grove.  Exodus 23:10

This command to take a “sabbatical year” from planting and harvesting was completely unique to the people of Israel and their God! But many scholars see multiple benefits to what sounds, at first, like craziness. It emphasized complete dependence on God to provide; it encouraged a rebalancing of life around worship as well as work; it allowed the land to lie fallow and replenish itself for future seasons of growth; and, finally, it was a way to care for the poor who could reap whatever grew in the fields for their own use.

We understand that the “sabbatical law” of the Old Testament is no longer a requirement for us as God’s people, but there are a couple of spiritual principles that still do apply to our lives. First, there are things more important than our work. Work is good and God wants us to work to provide for our families, but our relationship with him and our relationships with our families are more important than what we do to earn a living. Second, we have a responsibility to care for others. Allowing the poor to use your fields every seven years was a form of compassion and generosity that reflects the character of God himself. We are to be people of both compassion and generosity.

But the deeper issue is a very simple one; complete trust in God’s word and the surrender of obedience.

And we will forego the crops of the seventh year and the exaction of every debt.


Nehemiah believed God was good and could be trusted; he believed that God’s word carried authority and should be obeyed.

Sometimes obedience sounds crazy.

Sometimes obedience costs us something.

But obedience to God’s word is always good.

Pastor Brian Coffey

Wednesday, August 27th

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Wednesday, August 27

Nehemiah 10:28-39


“The rest of the people, the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, the temple servants, and all who have separated themselves from the peoples of the lands to the Law of God, their wives, their sons, their daughters, all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes. We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land or take their daughters for our sons. And if the peoples of the land bring in goods or any grain on the Sabbath day to sell, we will not buy from them on the Sabbath or on a holy day.

Over the past decade or so pastors like me have noticed an interesting trend in their congregations. The simplest way to summarize the trend is that people are attending weekend worship services with less frequency than they did just a few years ago.


Just 10-15 years ago the average “church family” attended weekend worship just over twice a month. Now before you start to argue with me about that, remember that I am talking about attendance over a whole calendar year, including summers, spring break and Christmas vacation. The numbers were very consistent year after year. Another way to say it is, on any given weekend we had just over half of our total church family in attendance. If there were 4000 people worshiping over Easter weekend (Easter is a time when pretty much the whole church family shows up), the very next weekend that number would drop to right around 2000.


But just a few years ago we noticed the pattern starting to change. Now the average family attends a little less than twice a month; and on any given weekend we have only about 45% of our church family in attendance. So if Easter weekend saw worship attendance of 4000, the very next weekend would drop to about 1800 or so.


So one of the curious things happening at FBCG these days is that we are growing as a church family - we can tell through giving and a few other metrics - but our weekend worship attendance is flat or slightly declining.


What is going on?


While we don’t understand all the dynamics fully, the simplest explanation is that we live in a hyper-busy suburban subculture that no longer respects Sunday as a day reserved for rest and worship. Between work and kids sports there’s always something competing for time on weekends, so it is more and more difficult to make corporate worship a priority.


Another factor is that technology now allows us to watch sermons on line after the fact, or give our offerings at times other than Sunday morning; and with many mid-week ministry options available, we don’t feel like we miss very much by missing a weekend worship service.


So what do we make of all this; and what guidance can we get from God’s word?


Here we notice that Nehemiah is clearly calling people back to a commitment to observe the Sabbath day as a holy day.

And if the peoples of the land bring in goods or any grain on the Sabbath day to sell, we will not buy from them on the Sabbath or on a holy day.


He is reminding the people of God’s commandment back in Exodus:

“Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.  Exodus 20:8-11


God wanted his people to know the importance of resting from their work to worship together and to experience the holiness and comfort of his presence.


Then Jesus further explains the purpose of the Sabbath in the New Testament when he says:


And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. Mark 2:27

Jesus was teaching that God established the Sabbath for our benefit not just as a religious law to be kept. Sabbath is about refreshing and enriching our relationship with our God through worship, praise, celebration and rest.

Back to the trend of decreasing church attendance. I think Jesus would be concerned about that trend. But I don’t think he would be concerned because, as Christians, we are supposed to go to church! I don’t think he would throw the Sabbath commandment at us and say, “Hey, go to church because I said so!” That’s what legalism would say, but it’s not what Jesus would say.

I think Jesus would be concerned because he knows what the hectic pace of our culture does to our souls and our relationships. I think Jesus wants us to want to come to church! I think he would say something like, “What could be better than acknowledging the glory of  God in the company of a worshiping church? What have you found to do with your weekends that is better than that?”

Is our busy suburban North American culture increasingly robbing us of our weekends? Yes, it is.

Can we worship God on Tuesday, by ourselves, while walking on a bike trail? Absolutely! Do we have to go to church in order to receive God’s grace and salvation? No.

So why is it important to gather with the body of Christ as often as we can to share worship together?

Perhaps Jesus said it best:

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” Matthew 11:28

Pastor Brian Coffey

Tuesday, August 26th

To listen to the audio version, click here.

Tuesday, August 26

Nehemiah 10:28-39


“The rest of the people, the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, the temple servants, and all who have separated themselves from the peoples of the lands to the Law of God, their wives, their sons, their daughters, all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes. We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land or take their daughters for our sons.

Like most pastors, I have done my share of weddings over the years. While I haven’t kept a count I would put the number somewhere over 200. And in almost every wedding I have done there is a moment called “The giving of the bride.” This moment usually comes right after the bride is escorted by her father down the aisle while the guests stand and oooh and ahhh at her radiant beauty! 


I say, “Since so-and-so and so-and-so have come before me to be married, I now ask, who gives this woman to be married to this man?”


At that point the father of the bride swallows hard and then croaks out his well-rehearsed answer, “Her mother and I.” Then, usually with tears in his eyes, he lifts his daughter’s veil, gives her a tender kiss, and then punches his future son-in-law as hard as he can in the arm and sits down. I’m just kidding about that last part, but I think that’s what most fathers of the bride really want to do!


I think if I could look into the heart of almost any father who stands at the front of a church to give away his little girl to another man, I would find a heart full of love, hope and fear. Love, because he loves his daughter with his very life; hope, because he hopes for her great happiness and joy; and fear, because he fears that the man he gives her to will not love her the way God wants her to be loved.


I think that’s what is behind the covenant Nehemiah is proclaiming to the people of Jerusalem.


We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land or take their daughters for our sons.


Nehemiah is acknowledging the importance of shared faith in marriage. The people groups living in the region of Jerusalem did not acknowledge, worship or serve the God of Israel. Most of the surrounding cultures were polytheistic or served pagan deities. Therefore they did not share the same values as the Israelites and Nehemiah is emphasizing the dangers inherent in marrying outside one’s own faith.


This danger has nothing to do with ethnic, educational or economic background, but rather with the importance of building the spiritual DNA of a family.


I have counseled many couples who did not consider a shared spiritual commitment to be important at the time of their marriage, only to discover the lack of a spiritual foundation to be the source of great conflict and pain later in their relationship, especially when they begin to raise children in their home.


Nehemiah is reminding the people that what they believe about their God matters! He’s reminding the people that holiness matters. He’s reminding them that they belong to God and are set apart for his purposes.


He’s also reminding them that families matter as well. A marriage that lacks a spiritual foundation is on shaky ground. Likewise, a family without a spiritual foundation is like a home without walls; everyone who lives there is vulnerable to all manner of threats from the outside.


If you are married, does your marriage have a spiritual foundation? If you are a parent, are you invested in establishing a spiritual foundation for your family? May we remember the words of Nehemiah:


We will not give our daughters to the peoples of the land...

Pastor Brian Coffey

Monday, August 25th

To listen to the audio version, click here.

Monday, August 25

Nehemiah 10:28-39


“The rest of the people, the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, the temple servants, and all who have separated themselves from the peoples of the lands to the Law of God, their wives, their sons, their daughters, all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes.

A number of years ago FBCG’s East Campus was serving as a polling place for an election and the lobby was filled with people who weren’t part of our church family. At some point in the morning I stepped out of my office for a moment and was greeted by one of the election officials. I didn’t recognize him because he didn’t worship at FBCG, but I offered a polite “Hello,” and then was surprised when he kind of nodded back over his shoulder toward the sanctuary and said, “So what are you doing in there?”


I said, “Excuse me?”


He repeated, “What are you doing in there?” with the same nod toward the sanctuary. This time he followed up with a little more explanation of his question. He continued, “I drive by here on Sunday mornings and there are cars parked all over the place! So I’m just wondering what you are doing in there to get all these people to come to church?”


This time I understood his question, and responded the best I could on the spur of the moment. I said something like, “Well, we just do our best to worship God and preach his word.”


That’s where we are in the story of Nehemiah as well! Let’s recap the journey so far:


Nehemiah hears the walls of Jerusalem are still broken down and he grieves and prays to the God of heaven.


Nehemiah receives permission from the King to travel to Jerusalem for the purpose of rebuilding the wall.


He puts together a plan and inspires the people to join him.


He leads the people to rebuild the wall in 52 days, overcoming great opposition along the way.


He then seeks to repopulate the city with the descendants of the first exiles who had returned decades earlier.


Then Nehemiah leads the people in a re-reading of God’s word and a time of communal confession of sin.


Now he leads the people of Jerusalem in a public commitment to obey God’s word.


The rest of the people... all who have knowledge and understanding, join with their brothers, their nobles, and enter into a curse and an oath to walk in God's Law that was given by Moses the servant of God, and to observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord and his rules and his statutes.


Nehemiah knew it wasn’t enough for the people of God to have a restored wall and a restored Temple. He knew they needed to also be a people of God’s word!

Think of it this way.

Not many of us ever get so busy that we forget to eat; at least I rarely forget to eat! Yet, I think many of us use our busy lives as a kind of excuse for not spending more intentional time reading and thinking about God’s word.

The Bible itself teaches that God’s word is like food for our souls.

In 1 Peter 2:2 we read:

...like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation...

At FBCG we preach from God’s word in every worship service but hearing from God’s word once a week is like having one meal a week! If you are reading or listening to “10 Minutes with God” you are seeking to nourish your soul on a daily basis and I would simply encourage you to share these daily devotionals with someone else who may need such spiritual nourishment from God’s word.

Last year we did a whole series of messages from Psalm 119 and we memorized together the key verse from that series. I think there’s a good chance Nehemiah had this verse memorized as well!

I delight in your decrees; I will not neglect your word. Psalm 119:16

Just as we don’t neglect to nourish our bodies, may we not neglect the nourishment of our souls. May we, too, be a people of the word!

Pastor Brian Coffey

Friday, August 22nd

To listen to the audio version, click here.

“You saw the suffering of our ancestors in Egypt; you heard their cry at the Red Sea. You sent signs and wonders against Pharaoh, against all his officials and all the people of his land, for you knew how arrogantly the Egyptians treated them. You made a name for yourself, which remains to this day. You divided the sea before them, so that they passed through it on dry ground, but you hurled their pursuers into the depths, like a stone into mighty waters. By day you led them with a pillar of cloud, and by night with a pillar of fire to give them light on the way they were to take.

“You came down on Mount Sinai; you spoke to them from heaven. You gave them regulations and laws that are just and right, and decrees and commands that are good. You made known to them your holy Sabbath and gave them commands, decrees and laws through your servant Moses. In their hunger you gave them bread from heaven and in their thirst you brought them water from the rock; you told them to go in and take possession of the land you had sworn with uplifted hand to give them.


“You heard their cry” – For centuries God’s people cried out and wondered where God was. Why wasn’t he listening to their cry? Now, looking back, the Israelites realize that God was there all along. He was listening to their cries, and he responded in the most incredible way. Why did he wait as long as he did? How could he let his people suffer for so long? God was doing something in the life of his people. One could argue that God even rescued them too soon, as the people argued and complained, desiring to be back in Egypt living in punishment and enslavement. How often do we revert back to our old sinful ways, desiring to go back to our Egypt, thinking that it is better than what God desires or offers? The people would need another forty years of training before they were ready to truly follow God.  Praise God for delivering us! Praise God for hearing us!

“You made a name for yourself” – It continues to amaze me that with such a pathetic following, God’s name is continually made great. His name continues to be praised, even though, we, his people, continue to screw things up for him. Rather than abandoning us completely, God is patient, and continues to work in us and through us. God does not need us to make him great. He already is great. He does not need us to make a name for him among the nations. He made a name for himself. Yet, God continues to allow us to partner with him in his work. What a gracious gift! What a weight that is lifted from us, knowing that even during our messiest times, God continues to make a name for himself!

“You led them” – it would have been enough if God had simply rescued his people, then left them alone to figure out how to live life now that they were free. It would have definitely been a lot less work for him! Sometimes, our minds deceive us into thinking this way. We cry out to God, begging him to save us from the mess we have made, then, once he rescues us, we go back to living life on our own, thinking that we will do better the next time around. Yet, God chooses to lead his people. He does not leave them hanging. He led them by day, and by night. He led them through the “bright” times, and through the “dark” times. God is still doing that for us today. Praise God for his activity in our lives, and for leading us each day! Praise God for the gift of his Holy Spirit who is leading and instructing us!

“You came down” – Stop. Read that again. “You” “Came” “Down” let that thought settle in your minds for a moment. God descended to his people. God’s people have always been dependent on this one act of God. We have never been able to reach the heights of God. If God did not come down to his people there would be no communicating with God. If God did not come down and visit his people we would not know what it means to be led. If God did not come down, how would we even truly know him? The greatest act of God is in the fact that He came down. He did it in the Old Testament on numerous occasions. Those are fun stories to read. He did it in the New Testament. He came down, and made a place for himself among his people. He spoke to people. He lived with his people. He walked the earth he created. He showed his people how to live. And then, he died, giving his people life. He did that, when he came down. Praise God, that he is not a far off God, but he is a God who is near to his people!

Pastor Jonathan Goble

Thursday, August 21st

To listen to the audio version, click here.

“You alone are the Lord. You made the heavens, even the highest heavens, and all their starry host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them. You give life to everything, and the multitudes of heaven worship you.”

“You are the Lord God, who chose Abram and brought him out of Ur of the Chaldeans and named him Abraham. You found his heart faithful to you, and you made a covenant with him to give to his descendants the land of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Jebusites and Girgashites. You have kept your promise because you are righteous.”


“You alone are the Lord” – Just before the Levites remind the people of the Creation Narrative, they begin with the reminder that God is the one true God. There is no other. While he alone is God, we also know that this is a triune God, three in one. It is fascinating that in the creation narrative God is referred to as “Elohim” in each instance. This denotes that he is “God,” “Ruler,” “Judge,” “Creator” (Strong’s Lexicon” The word “Elohim” is the plural form for God. In this introduction to God as creator, we are also introduced to the plurality of God. How awesome is that?


“You made…” – Not only do the Israelites recognize God as the Creator of the universe, they also take note of the vastness of his creation. He has created all things far and near. Creating is his nature. Did you know that he is still creating today? Some day, he will create a new heaven and a new earth. He is continuing to create inside of you and me. David recognized that God was creating in him a clean heart. He continues to create as he makes all things new. God is always doing something new. What new thing has he been doing in your life? Praise him for his work in your life. 


“You give life…” – One of my favorite images of God is the giver of life. When God created Adam, he picked up some dirt from the ground and breathed life into it. Sometimes I feel like that lump of dirt sitting in God’s hands. Then, at just right time, he breathes life into me. Have ever experienced God as the life giver? Praise him for this life! 


In the New Testament we see Jesus “breathing life” on another occasion. The situation is not all that different. Jesus knows that his time on earth is drawing to an end, and he will soon breathe his last breath. Yet, before that happens, he takes his disciples aside and breathes on them the Holy Spirit. In this passage, Jesus gives Spiritual Life. Jesus breathes eternal life into his disciples! And this eternal life has also been given to you and to me! Praise him for this eternal life!


“Multitudes of heaven worship you” – He is Lord of Heaven. Think about that. He is Lord of the Highest of Heights. He is Lord over all natural and supernatural beings. He is the supreme being, of which none can compare. So great is He, that all of Heaven worships him! It is because of this that we can rest assured in Paul’s words:


“For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 7:38-39) 


Praise Him, for no one and nothing can separate you from his Love!

“You have kept your promise” – What was God thinking when he made a covenant with his creation? Surely he knew that the Israelites would not be able to hold their end of the bargain. This covenant was made post “The Fall of Man.” If there was ever a bad time for God to make a covenant with his people, this was definitely it! There appears to be nothing good in this deal for God, and all things good available to the Israelites if they can somehow remain true to this covenant. Yet, time after time the Israelites failed. Still, we find God, remaining true to his word, never going back on his promise. The Israelites now recognize this, and they praise God for keeping his Promise. Praise God for his promises that remain true for us even today!


“You are righteous” – Because God is righteous, his commands are right and true. Because God is righteous, the sins of the people are now before them. Because God is righteous, he requires his people to live righteously. Where is the comfort in this?


“My dear children, I write this to you so that you will not sin. But if anybody does sin, we have an advocate with the Father—Jesus Christ, the Righteous One.” (1 John 2:1) Praise God that our salvation is not based upon our righteous living, but rather the righteousness of the one who was sent by God – Jesus!

Pastor Jonathan Goble