Friday, Dec. 19th

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Friday, December 19

John 1: 12-13
 

But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

This text, along with a number of others in the Bible, points to two kinds of birth. There is physical birth; the biological process by which a human infant is thrust from the mother’s womb and out into the cold world. This process is usually preceded by intense labor pains, considerable mess, and followed by great tears of joy. Physical birth is something that all human beings have in common.

The second kind of birth is spiritual. It does not involve a mother’s womb although it often does involve a kind of labor, at least some mess, as well as tears of joy. Spiritual birth is not the result of the physical love of a man and a woman, rather it is the result of the redemptive work of God who brings new life to a once deadened heart.

Earlier in the week I mentioned a speech President Obama gave during the lighting of the National Christmas Tree and I want to mention it again today. He said:

“It’s the story of hope--the birth of a singular child into the simplest of circumstances--a child who would grow up to live a life of humility, and kindness, and compassion...who taught us to care for the poor, and the marginalized, and those who are different from ourselves,” “And more than two millennia later, the way he lived still compels us to do our best to build a more just and tolerant and decent world.


All that sounds good, and certainly we are to live lives of “humility, kindness and compassion,” but that’s not the primary reason Jesus came; at least not according to the Bible.

In Ephesians 2 Paul writes:

As for you, you were dead in your transgressions and sins, in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient. All of us also lived among them at one time, gratifying the cravings of our flesh and following its desires and thoughts. Like the rest, we were by nature deserving of wrath. But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved.  (Ephesians 2:1-5)


Paul reminds us here that the point of Christianity; the point of the Word becoming flesh; the point of Jesus dying on the cross and rising again from the dead; was not to make us better people, but rather to turn spiritually dead  people into spiritually alive people.

Jesus said it this way:

Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.”
(John 3:3)


The heart of the Christian faith is not about goodness or tolerance or compassion or service; the heart of the Christian faith is death and resurrection.


Right now some of you are thinking, “Hey, Pastor Brian, you’re talking about the wrong holiday! 


We’re supposed to talk about death and resurrection at Easter; this is Christmastime! Let’s talk about the baby in the manger!”

Well, I am talking about the baby in the manger! One of great problems of our cultural celebration of Christmas is that we have cut the gospel out of the story.


The whole story begins with an angel coming to Joseph to tell him about the child already growing in his fiancé's womb:


“Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.”(Matthew 1:21)


There is it.


There’s the reason for the whole story.


“He will save his people from their sins.”


The child in the manger is the man on the cross.


The man on the cross died that you and I might live.


The last verse of “O Little Town of Bethlehem” says it well:


O holy Child of Bethlehem,


Descend to us, we pray;

Cast out our sins and enter in,

Be born in us today.


Pastor Brian Coffey

Thursday, Dec. 18th

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Thursday, December 18

Romans 8:14-16


For those who are led by the Spirit of God are the children of God. The Spirit you received does not make you slaves, so that you live in fear again; rather, the Spirit you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, “Abba, Father.” The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children.

There are two ways to join a family.


You can be born into that family; that is, you can have a biological relationship to your family; or, you can be adopted into a family with whom you have no biological connection.


One of the things we often miss in the story of Jesus’ birth is that the whole thing is about adoption!


Think about it:


The Bible says that Mary was with child “by the Holy Spirit,” which means, among other things, that Joseph was an adoptive father. Jesus was not his biological son.


That also means Jesus grew up in a blended family. Scripture indicates that Mary and Joseph went on to have other biological children after they were married, and those children would have been technically Jesus’ step- brothers and sisters.


But beyond all of that, the Bible tells us that Jesus came so that we could be adopted into God’s family.


In his letter to the Romans, Paul uses adoption to explain salvation.

The Spirit you received does not make you slaves, so that you live in fear again; rather, the Spirit you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, “Abba, Father.” The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are God’s children.


To understand the power of Paul’s thought here we must understand something of the nature of adoption in the ancient Roman world.

First of all, there was a fundamental distinction in that society between those considered Roman citizens and those considered slaves. Slaves were men and women from the lower class who were regarded as the property of the families they served, and had little or no protection under the law.

However, it was quite common for affluent but childless Roman families to adopt a slave, most often a post-pubescent male, to carry on the family name. The process of adoption included the cancellation of any and all debts of the slave being adopted, as well as a complete change of identity. The slave now become son would also receive a full share of the family inheritance. Once adopted the bond  established could not be broken.

Paul is saying that through faith we are all adopted children of God! Through faith in Christ we are no longer slaves to sin and the fear of condemnation, but are now sons and daughters of a new Father. Furthermore, our new position is confirmed by the Holy Spirit who reminds us that we belong to God.

Not only do we belong to God, we have also been promised an inheritance. Paul goes on to say:

Now if we are children, then we are heirs—heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ, if indeed we share in his sufferings in order that we may also share in his glory. (Romans 8:17)


I was not raised in an adoptive family; and I have never adopted a child. But I have known many adoptive parents over the years and have come to see the beauty of adoption as a picture of the gospel.


An adoptive parent is not obliged to adopt a child, yet chooses to do so.


An adoptive parent is not obliged to sacrifice in order to provide for a child yet chooses to do so.


An adoptive parent is not obliged to open his or her heart to love and care for a child yet chooses to do so.


In the same way God was not obliged to reach down to us; to love and care for us; or to sacrifice himself on our behalf, yet he chose to do so in Jesus.


Now the Spirit bears witness with our spirit that we are God’s children.


Pastor Brian Coffey

Wednesday, Dec. 17th

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Wednesday, December 17

Ephesians 1:4-14 (selected)


In love he predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ, according to the purpose of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace, with which he has blessed us in the Beloved. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace...


In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of it, to the praise of his glory.


I love to hear people’s stories of how they came to faith in Jesus.


We call them faith-stories or “Gospel stories.” I’ve heard all kinds of stories; some are sudden and emotional; some are more gradual and cerebral; and some are wildly unpredictable.


In the text from Ephesians, Paul says:


In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit...


A faith-story, or gospel story, is what happens between hearing the word of truth and believing in Jesus.


One of my favorite stories of coming to faith is the story C.S. Lewis tells in his book “Surprised by Joy.”


Lewis had experienced a great deal of sadness and loss in his early life and, like many, had decided that there could not be a God if there was so much pain and suffering in the world.


But through several key friendships and after wrestling with his own inner turmoil over a number of months, he describes his coming to faith this way:


You must picture me alone in that room in Magdalen, night after night, feeling, whenever my mind lifted even for a second from my work, the steady, unrelenting approach of Him whom I so earnestly desired not to meet. That which I greatly feared had at last come upon me. In the Trinity Term of 1929 I gave in, and admitted that God was God, and knelt and prayed: perhaps, that night, the most dejected and reluctant convert in all England. I did not then see what is now the most shining and obvious thing; the Divine humility which will accept a convert even on such terms.


I love his honest and eloquent description!


“I gave in...and admitted God was God...” 


There’s the decision. That’s what John means when he writes:


But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God,

Several key things to notice here:


Notice that John is saying that we are not born as “children of God.” Now, we are all children of God in the sense that we are created by God; but that’s not what John is talking about. 


He’s talking about salvation here.


With regard to salvation, we are not born children of God.  


We are born alienated from God. The Apostle Paul writes in Romans: 


For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23)


So what hope do we have?


Do we just try to do as much good as we can to outweigh our sins? I think this is the “go-to” spiritual strategy of most people in our culture. I think most people think that, if there is a God, what he wants most is for us just to be good people; you know, be a good neighbor, care about the less fortunate, don’t kill anyone, and hope for the best.


Now, those aren’t bad things, and surely God wants us to do good things, but it’s just not the point of Christianity.


So, if we can’t pile up enough good deeds to earn our place with God, then what are we to do? Are we all doomed like Grandpa Joe to just take what’s comin’ to us?


John says there are 2 conditions to becoming a child of God: receiving and believing.


What does it mean to “receive and believe” Jesus?


These terms are often used interchangeably in the New Testament, but if there is a subtle difference it would be the following.


“Receiving” comes from a word that means to take, to lay hold of, to accept with initiative. It’s not passive but active. 


For example: Someone offers you a Christmas gift, but it’s not yours until you reach out and take it. That’s what John means by “receiving.”


“Believing” is a word that means to trust fully in something or someone. 


For example: You’re on your way over the hills and through the woods to grandma’s house for Christmas. But your car runs out of gas and you’re stuck on the side of a country road. You have no choice but to try to hitchhike to a gas station. A farmer pulls over in his pick up truck and offers you a ride. You have to decided whether or not you trust him. To believe is to get in his truck and trust him to get you to the gas station.


So what are we being asked to receive and believe about Jesus?


1 Corinthians 15:3-4


For what I received I passed on to you as of first importance: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures...


It means to believe that Jesus is who John says he is; the eternal Word of God; that Jesus is God himself come in the flesh.


It means to believe that Jesus died on the cross for our sins because forgiveness of sin requires the shedding of blood.


It means to believe that Jesus rose from the dead to both prove his authority as the Son of God and to guarantee our own victory over death.


To receive and believe is more than intellectual assent to a set of theological statements. It is committing oneself to all that Jesus is and means. It means complete unconditional surrender. It means not just believing the farmer and his pick-up truck exist, but to get in the truck and trust the farmer to get you to the gas station!


I think there are two primary ways of receiving and believing. I call them “point in time” and “process.” 


“Point in time” people hear the gospel, accept it, and begin their spiritual journey with a decision.


“Process people” often hear the gospel, question it, wrestle with it, sometimes for years, and then culminate their process a decision. 


Very often “point in time” people can point to a specific moment when they received Christ, or came to believe. 


Maybe they attended a Billy Graham crusade; or walked to the front of a sanctuary to pray with a pastor; or stood on the beach gazing out at the Pacific Ocean and were overwhelmed by the magnitude of God’s grace.


But there is a clear moment of decision; often very dramatic or emotional.


For “process people” receiving and believing is much more arduous. It can be a long journey of learning, thinking, considering and questioning. I have heard people say that it took them 20 years to come to faith in Jesus, but that they couldn’t point to any specific moment.
I think C.S. Lewis’ story was a process story. He wasn’t convinced quickly but only after a long process of wrestling with himself, with truth, and with God.


Then, as a result of the process, he surrendered!    


So what’s your story?


Whether you are a “point in time” person or a “process” person, the most important thing is that you have “heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation,” and you have received Jesus and believe in him.

Pastor Brian Coffey

Tuesday, Dec. 16th

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Tuesday, December 16

John 1:10-12
 

The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

My Mom grew up in the hills of eastern Kentucky and was the first person in her family to make a personal commitment to Christ. She was 19 years old and heard the gospel in a tiny church led by a missionary preacher who happened to be a woman. I think there were something like 9 people in church the night my Mom heard the gospel and decided to follow Jesus. 


She immediately started to try to share the gospel with her family and, in particular, with her grandfather; a crusty mountain man the family affectionately called “Grandpa Joe.” From the stories my Mom tells, Grandpa Joe was a former coal miner and a bingeing alcoholic who would disappear for weeks at a time when he would start drinking. Then he would sober up and come home and then it would happen all over again. 


Some time after my Mom came to faith in Jesus Grandpa Joe had to be hospitalized. He was dying of “Black Lung disease” from all his years in the coal mines; his condition probably complicated even further by cirrhosis of the liver.


My Mom loved her Grandpa and went to visit him in the hospital. She did her best to share the gospel with him and urged him to confess his sins and receive the grace and forgiveness of Christ. 


But Grandpa Joe was a tough old bird, and he argued back with her, saying, “But daughter, I can’t think of anything I’ve done wrong!” He was just joking with her, of course, because he knew he was a scoundrel. Finally he looked at her from his deathbed and said with all seriousness, “I’d be a coward to ask for forgiveness now; I gotta take what’s comin’ to me.”


John writes: 


The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him.

John is telling us there are two kinds of people in the world; those who receive him and those who refuse him.

Who is “him?”

“Him” is Jesus, the one John has been talking about for the first 14 verses of his gospel! Jesus is the eternal Word of God; the true light that enlightens everyone; Jesus is the Word that became flesh and dwelt among us.

John is saying that the central question every human being must answer; and the central question of all human history is, “Who is Jesus and what do I decide about him?”


Notice that John says that Jesus came into the world but that the world did not know him. Then John says Jesus came to his own, and his own people did not receive him.

I think John is saying there are two primary ways that people fail to acknowledge Jesus.

First, there are those who fail to understand, to grasp, who Jesus is and what he has come to offer them. This past week President Obama gave a speech during the lighting of the National Christmas Tree. Among other things he said:

“It’s the story of hope--the birth of a singular child into the simplest of circumstances--a child who would grow up to live a life of humility, and kindness, and compassion...who taught us to care for the poor, and the marginalized, and those who are different from ourselves,” “And more than two millennia later, the way he lived still compels us to do our best to build a more just and tolerant and decent world.


All that sounds good, but that’s not the primary reason Jesus came, not according to the Bible.

I think John is saying that the world generally misunderstands who Jesus is.

Second, there are those to whom Jesus has come personally, who have heard the gospel clearly yet have chosen to reject Jesus’ offer of forgiveness and salvation. This would be Grandpa Joe, after hearing my mother explain the gospel to him, saying, “I gotta take what’s comin’ to me.” This is a direct rejection of Jesus.

But whether through chosen ignorance or direct rejection,
the Bible is very clear; God has revealed himself to all so all have to make a choice.

Scripture says that God has revealed himself most clearly through Jesus. In Hebrews 1 we read:

In the past God spoke to our ancestors through the prophets at many times and in various ways, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son... (Hebrews 1:1)


But scripture also teaches that God has revealed himself through the world that he made. In Romans 1 we read:

For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse (Romans 1:20)

Therefore the Bible teaches that every human being makes a choice, a fundamentally spiritual choice that can be framed in a number of different ways.

People can choose to believe that the universe was created by a transcendent and eternal God, or that it happened by accident.

People can choose to believe that there is a God or there is not a God. If there is no God then there are no further choices to make. Live however you want because all of life is simply survival of the fittest.

But if I decide there is a God who created all things, including me, then I must make a whole series of decisions. What is this God like? What does he expect of me? How do I know him? How do I live in relationship with this God?

We must make a decision about Jesus. John says to make that decision we must “receive and believe.”

Back to the story of Grandpa Joe. The truth is, of course, that Grandpa Joe was indeed a coward, but not for the reason he thought. He was a coward not because he was willing to pay the price for his many sins, but rather because he was unwilling to accept the invitation to confess, repent and receive Christ’s offer of grace and forgiveness.


Sadly, Grandpa Joe made his decision about Jesus.


Have you?

Pastor Brian Coffey

Monday, Dec. 15th

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Monday, December 15

John 1:1-14


In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness, to bear witness about the light, that all might believe through him. He was not the light, but came to bear witness about the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God. And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.

I grew up in a pastor’s family and one of the great blessings of my life is that I don’t remember a single day when I didn’t know about Jesus and his love for me.


But when I was 8 years old something happened that helped me understand Jesus in a more personal way. A guest preacher came to our small church in Akron, Ohio. He was a traveling evangelist who my Dad had known for several years; his name was Dr. James DeWeerd.


I still remember, even after 50 years, that he had a deep, booming voice and that he told really cool war stories.
Dr. DeWeerd had served as a chaplain during WW2 and was wounded twice on the same day. He was wounded while tending to a soldier in battle; then wounded again when the ambulance he was in was hit by a mortar shell. As you might imagine, his stories captured my 8-year-old imagination!


Later that day he joined our family for Sunday dinner and elaborated on his war experiences. He said his wounds were such that during his recovery he had to learn to breathe out of one lung at a time. He then showed us that it was a trick he could still do. Sure enough, as he breathed you could see one side of his chest filling with air while the other did not. I thought that was the most amazing thing I had ever seen to that point in my young life!


My brother and I spent all afternoon trying to do it.


All that to say that when Dr. DeWeerd spoke, I listened.


At one point in his sermon that day he said this sentence: “You’re not a Christian here today just because your parents are!”


Even though I was only 8 years old I understood what he meant.


He was saying that even though my Dad was pastor of the church; even though I had known about Jesus since I was old enough to understand words; I was not a Christian until I made a personal decision about Jesus.


So the next morning I knelt on the floor of our living room with my Mom and prayed to ask Jesus to come into my heart.


Now I was only 8, and had a great deal to learn about what it means to follow Jesus, but I believe that my spiritual life with Christ started that day!


John writes:


He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God...


Many, if not most people who believe in God, believe that what God requires of them is to be good people. Most believe that if they are kind to their neighbors, don’t use profane language (at least not very often), and don’t kill anybody, that they will go to heaven when they die.

In other words, they believe they are children of God simply by being born and by making a reasonable effort to be good.

That’s not what John says.

John is telling us that the eternal Word of God, Jesus Christ, came all the way from heaven to be born as a human baby not just to give us a nice, quaint holiday to celebrate once a year; but to save us from our sins.

Christmas is not just remembering that Jesus was born in Bethlehem so long ago; Christmas is remembering why he was born.

In the very last verse of his gospel John writes:

But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. (John 20:31)


What Dr. DeWeerd said all those years ago is still true. You’re not a Christian today because your parents were Christians; you’re not a Christian because your grandfather was a Baptist preacher; you’re not a Christian because you go to church or give money or serve the less fortunate.


You are a Christian if you have received Jesus and believe  in his name. And that requires a spiritual decision.


We’ll talk more about that decision tomorrow!

Pastor Brian Coffey

Friday, Dec. 12

Friday


In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.   - John 1:1-5

John tells us that the Word (Logos) is the light of life for all people.  In other words, Jesus, the Word of God, is the ultimate source of all light and life.  This is true both physically, He created light and life, and it is also true spiritually in that Jesus is the source of all truth and the only way to salvation.  This is a constant theme throughout John’s gospel.

Jesus said, “You search the Scriptures because you think that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life. (John 5:40)

Jesus said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12)

Jesus said, "I have come that they might have life and have it more abundantly." (John 10:10)

Jesus said, "I am the way, the truth and the life." (John 14:6)

John tells us at the end of his gospel that “these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”  (John 20:31)

That last verse (5) tells us that the darkness of the world has not overcome the light of Christ.  Some translations of the Bible put it that the darkness has not extinguished the light, some say that the world has not overcome it, and still others translate it that the darkness has not understood the light.  The Greek word John uses here can actually mean all of these things.  It can mean to defeat, as in conquering an enemy.  It can also mean comprehend or grasp, as in understanding a concept.  

The point is that both of these things are true when it comes to how the world responds to Jesus; some reject Him and try to destroy His message, while others simply fail to truly understand who He is.

Jesus, the Logos, was in the world, and the world was made by Him but that the world did not know Him. Imagine Jesus walking on the earth that He had made. He often called their attention to the wonders of creation. Consider the lilies of the field. Consider the birds of the air. The tragic words, "But the world knew Him not."  But even worse; He came to His own, and His own received Him not. His own would refer to the people of Israel who received Him not.  The prophecy concerning the Messiah was fulfilled, "He was despised and rejected by men."  

They tried to put out the light because they did understand Him.  They nailed Him to a tree and thought they had put it out for two days, but on the third day the light began to shine brighter than ever. It seems that men who love the darkness more than the light are constantly trying to put the light out.  This was true in the first century, and it is true in the 21st century as well. 


Jesus was the eternal God incarnate, the creator of the Universe who came to this world which He had created to bring light to those who were perishing in the darkness. Those who believe in Him will receive the power to become the sons of God, by being born by the will of the Father into the family of God.

Jeff Frazier

Thursday, Dec. 11

Thursday


In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  
- John 1:1

And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.  - John 1:14


This Greek word Logos translated "Word" doesn’t really mean what our english “word” communicates.  To the Greeks, “logos” referred to the reason or purpose behind all things, a kind of cosmic first principle.  This idea of the logos has an interesting history in Greek thought.  In about 560 B.C. there lived a Greek philosopher named Heraclitus. He taught that the world was in a constant state of flux, everything was constantly changing.  If you stepped into the river and stepped out, then stepped back in, you would not be stepping in the same river that you stepped in a moment ago. The current is constantly flowing. But If things are in the state of constant change, then how can you avoid chaos? His answer was the logos. The word or reason. The logos was the cosmic reason or purpose that kept order in the universe.

The greek philosophers took this idea of a logos (cosmic reason and order) and  proposed that in our lives there is also a pattern, that nothing really happened by happenstance, that there was an order and pattern in all things. This order and pattern they also called the logos.  Later the Stoics looking at the order in the Universe, the fact that the stars were not colliding with each other, the ebb and flow of the tides, the seasons of the year, all spoke of order which they called the logos/Word.

John was writing his gospel primarily to the Greeks. He was living in the city of Ephesus, the same city in which Heraclitus had lived some 600 years earlier.  That John was writing to the Greeks was evident from the fact that whenever he used a Hebrew word, he always translated it into Greek.  Some examples of this are verse 38, Rabbi which is translated Master, or Verse 41, Messias which being interpreted, is Christ. 

So, the Greek who thought of the logos as that order behind the universe, that which gives meaning to life, that which tells us what is right and wrong. He declares, In the beginning was the Logos, and the Logos was with God and the Word was God.  Then John goes on to say that this Logos, this divine reason and order behind all things actually took on flesh and dwelled among us!   

John is saying that the universal principle, purpose and reason behind all that exists is not a philosophy, it is a person!  Therefore the way that we align our lives with the universe is not by following a particular philosophical system, but by knowing and loving Him, the Logos, the Word!



Jeff Frazier